Close X
Get more out of WDDTY.com
by joining the site for free
Free 17-point plan to great health
Twice weekly e-news bulletins
Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
Sign up for free and claim your
17-point plan to great health
Free 17-point plan to great health

Twice weekly e-news bulletins

Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
OR

If you want to read our in-depth research articles or
have our amazing magazine delivered to your home
each month, then you have to pay.


Click here if you're interested
Helping you make better health choices

What Doctors Don't Tell You

In shops now or delivered to your home from only £3.50 an issue!

Subscribe!
May 2019 (Vol. 4 Issue 3)

Reducing air pollutants bigger benefit than curing breast cancer
About the author: 
Bryan Hubbard

Reducing air pollutants bigger benefit than curing breast cancer image

Cleaning up the air we breathe—and especially in polluted regions of India and China—would have a bigger impact on improving health and longevity than finding a cure for breast and lung cancer, a new research study claims.

Poor air quality cuts a year off our lives—although that is a general and global figure, and it's shortening the lives of those in polluted Asian areas far more dramatically than it is in North America or Europe, where there are stricter controls.

In real terms, air pollution is responsible for around 90,000 premature deaths in America and 1.1 million deaths in India every year.

Researchers from the University of Texas at Austin measured air pollution—specifically particulate matter (PM) smaller than 2.5 microns, which increases the risk of heart attacks, strokes, respiratory diseases and cancer—in 185 countries. PM2.5

pollution comes from power plants, cars and trucks, fires, and agricultural and industrial emissions.

Although the impact of air pollution on health is well known, the researchers are the first to calculate its impact on longevity. Creating cleaner air is one of the most significant things we can do to improve health, the researchers say, and "it's considerably larger than the benefit in survival we might see if we found cures for both lung and breast cancer combined," said researcher Joshua Apte.

This would have special impact in polluted countries such as India and China, where a 60-year-old's chances of living to 85 or older increase by up to 20 per cent if the air was cleaner, the researchers estimate.


References

(Source: Environmental Science & Technology Letters, 2018; doi: 10.1021/acs.estlett.8b00360)

You may also be interested in...

Latest Tweet

About

Since 1989, WDDTY has provided thousands of resources on how to beat asthma, arthritis, depression and many other chronic conditions..

Start by looking in our fully searchable database, active and friendly community forums and the latest health news.

Positive SSL Wildcard

Facebook Twitter

© 2010 - 2019 WDDTY Publishing Ltd.
All Rights Reserved